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  • Writer's picturePat Browne

SOOTHING SENSITIVE SKIN

A whopping 71% of North American adults report having sensitive skin.

Sensitive skin is a widespread complaint that makes the skin overreact to non-toxic products or external factors that are harmless in normal conditions. These skin reactions make the person feel discomfort or pain in the affected area. Although skin sensitivity does not always come with visible signs, it can trigger inflammation or redness, among other manifestations.

If it is true that anyone can have genetically sensitive skin, it is also true that it often becomes sensitive for using ill-suited products. Also, if the number of people affected by this condition has spiked over the last years, it may be due to the increasing air pollution, exposure to stronger UV rays, and abusive use of soaps and cosmetics.

HOW TO IDENTIFY SENSITIVE SKIN?

Sensitive skin reacts to most stimuli that can be whether external or internal.

EXTERNAL

Cold weather, wind, hot or cold water, the intake of medications, contact with most cosmetic products, soaps, chemical substances, certain fabrics or jewelry, etc.

INTERNAL

Stress, hormonal imbalance (menstruation, pregnancy, etc.).

We can classify the signs of sensitive skin into subjective or objective. Nevertheless, as mentioned above, most signs are subjective and not always accompanied by physical manifestations.

Subjective or sensory symptoms

  • Itching

  • Burning sensation

  • Stinging sensation

  • Tightness and dryness

Objective or visual signs

  • Blushing and flushing

  • Inflammation

  • Eczema

  • Hives

  • Rashes

Skin sensitivity can affect any body area. However, it is more common in the face, as the skin in this area is thinner and more exposed to environmental stressors.


CAUSES OF SENSITIVE SKIN

NATURAL PREDISPOSITION

All bodies are different, and so is the skin. Some people’s skin may react faster to stressors simply because their skin is thinner and external stressors penetrate more easily. Additionally, the nervous system also plays a crucial role in skin hyperreactivity. Some people have nerve endings that react more to any stimulus, causing discomfort or triggering inflammation.

Fair-skinner people are generally more affected by this condition, as their skin is slightly thinner than those with dark skin tones.

DISRUPTED SKIN BARRIER FUNCTION

The skin barrier is the protective film on the top of the skin that impedes the penetration of substances. Therefore, a disrupted skin barrier function facilitates the penetration of irritants and leaves the nerve endings poorly protected, which ultimately leads to skin hyperreactivity and sensitivity.

Considering that lipids are essential structural content of the skin barrier, keeping the skin well moisturized is crucial for sensitive-prone skin.

STRESS AND HORMONES

Stress triggers a chemical response that makes your skin more sensitive and reactive.

Indeed, stress makes keratinocytes (the most common type of skin cells) produce a hormone called Cortisol which promotes inflammation.

Furthermore, the fluctuation of estrogen throughout the women’s monthly cycle makes the skin more sensitive and reactive. Hormonal imbalance can down- or up-regulate sebum production with all the implications it may have on skin health and the integrity of the skin barrier.

HOW TO DEAL WITH SENSITIVE SKIN?

Sensitive skin may be chronic or improve with time. It may get better or worse at times. It depends if it is a natural disposition or triggered by an underlying problem, like stress.

GOOD HABITS FOR SENSITIVE SKIN

Some habits in your daily routine can help you cope better with sensitive skin or even make it disappear with time.

ONLY USE ADAPTED SKIN CARE PRODUCTS

Choose skin care products adapted to your condition, like INNO-DERMA® SENSITIVE CREAM, a moisturizer formulated to restore the skin’s acid mantle, while nourishing and soothing the skin. https://www.innoaesthetics.ca/sensitive-cream

In addition to INNO-DERMA® SENSITIVE CREAM, INNOAESTHETICS offers an in-office treatment that boosts the defenses of sensitive skin, regulating skin hyperreactivity by controlling the processes that may lead to skin sensitivity.



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